Singapore’s Huge National Gallery Will Open with Pompidou and Circumstance by Allison Meier on June 24, 2015

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Exterior of National Gallery Singapore (courtesy National Gallery Singapore, via Flickr)

The largest public collection of modern Southeast Asian art is opening this October, and the institution that will house it just announced a collaborative exhibition with the Centre Pompidou in 2016. National Gallery Singapore (NGS) joins two historic buildings — the city-state’s former Supreme Court and City Hall — with an adaptive reuse design by studioMilou Architecture. A gold roof of 15,000 aluminum panels sweeps between the neoclassical structures, with a light-strewn courtyard constructed in the center.

More: http://hyperallergic.com/217173/singapores-huge-national-gallery-will-open-with-pompidou-and-circumstance/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=NYC+Public+Libraries+Get+Largest+Funding+Increase+Ever&utm_content=NYC+Public+Libraries+Get+Largest+Funding+Increase+Ever+CID_e20561a0f8e40d06a00c00e0a5b8e37f&utm_source=HyperallergicNewsletter&utm_term=Singapores%20Huge%20National%20Gallery%20Will%20Open%20with%20Pompidou%20and%20Circumstance

Images of Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him) By Hussein Rashid

“What does Islam say about images?” It is a question that seeks to understand religion through unitary and static prescriptions.

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Folio from the Majma’ al-tawarikh (Compendium of history) by Hafiz Abru (d.1430); recto: The Birth of Muhammad; verso: text, Wet nurse Halima and her husband, Harith, taking care of infant Muhammad, 1426. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery #F2005.5.

At its core, the question is about what is “Islamic.” Such a question is problematic because a community of believers decides what the religion means. Because human beings are involved, there will be differences. While there are boundaries for who a Muslim is, such as belief in monotheism, the prophethood of Muhammad, and observance of certain ritual and legal obligations, there is a lot more that Muslims believe that is not universally agreed upon, thus generating difference.

The confusion starts because Muhammad played two roles within his community—religious and spiritual authority and policy leader. Like earlier Abrahamic prophets, the combination of the two roles was expected and accepted.

As we move away from the time of Muhammad, he takes on different meanings for different Muslim communities and non-Muslim communities engage with Muhammad’s legacy, as well. We have memories of Muhammad that are preserved and represented in a variety of ways.

More: https://scholarblogs.emory.edu/sacredmatters/2015/04/20/images-of-muhammad/

Images of Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him) By Hussein Rashid

introduction

“What does Islam say about images?” It is a question that seeks to understand religion through unitary and static prescriptions.

infant-236x300

Folio from the Majma’ al-tawarikh (Compendium of history) by Hafiz Abru (d.1430); recto: The Birth of Muhammad; verso: text, Wet nurse Halima and her husband, Harith, taking care of infant Muhammad, 1426. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery #F2005.5.

At its core, the question is about what is “Islamic.” Such a question is problematic because a community of believers decides what the religion means. Because human beings are involved, there will be differences. While there are boundaries for who a Muslim is, such as belief in monotheism, the prophethood of Muhammad, and observance of certain ritual and legal obligations, there is a lot more that Muslims believe that is not universally agreed upon, thus generating difference.

The confusion starts because Muhammad played two roles within his community—religious and spiritual authority and policy leader. Like earlier Abrahamic prophets, the combination of the two roles was expected and accepted.

As we move away from the time of Muhammad, he takes on different meanings for different Muslim communities and non-Muslim communities engage with Muhammad’s legacy, as well. We have memories of Muhammad that are preserved and represented in a variety of ways.

More: https://scholarblogs.emory.edu/sacredmatters/2015/04/20/images-of-muhammad/