“I was so poor and I had no studio,” says Christo. “I started working with little tin cans of paint” by Marcus Fairs from Dezeen

“I was so poor and I had no studio” says Christo. “I started working with little tin cans of paint”

In the first of two exclusive video interviews with Christo, the artist explains how the giant London Mastaba installation on the Serpentine lake is the culmination of over 60 years of working with stacked barrels.

christo-jeanne-claude-art-sculpture-architecture-roundup-_dezeen_2364_col_3

The temporary London project, which is 20 metres high and consists of 7,506 barrels, was unveiled last month. But the artwork has its genesis in experiments made by Christo, 83, and his late partner Jeanne-Claude in the fifties and sixties.

“I was born in Bulgaria and I escaped from the communist country to the west on 10 January 1957,” Christo explains in the movie, which Dezeen filmed in London. “I met Jeanne-Claude in November 1958 and we together fell in love.”

“We lived in Paris in between 58 and 64,” he continues. “I was so poor, I had no studio and I was living in one room. I started working with little cans, tin cans of industrial paint. From the cans of the smaller size, I moved to the smaller sized barrels. I rented a garage outside of Paris when I started working with real barrels.”

In 1962 he blocked a Paris street with stacked barrels in a reference to the Berlin Wall that was erected the previous year.

“I was worried the third world war would start,” Christo says. “The Soviets took over Budapest during the revolution [in 1956] but I escaped and there was a big turmoil. I remember I was very scared that they would run over West Germany and come back to Paris and I proposed to do my artistic Iron Curtain in the smallest street, in the Rue Visconti, of the left bank of Paris.”

video-christo-jeanne-claude-london-mastaba-serpentine-installation-art-sculpture-movie-wolfgang-volz_d_dezeen_2364_col_3

More: https://www.dezeen.com/2018/08/08/video-interview-christo-jeanne-claude-london-mastaba-serpentine-lake-installation-movie/“I was so poor and I had no studio” says Christo. “I started working with little tin cans of paint”

Kaiku turns fruit and vegetable waste into natural pigments by India Block from dezeen

Imperial graduate Nicole Stjernsward has invented Kaiku, a system that turns plants into powdered paint pigments using vaporisation technology.

Avocados, pomegranates, beetroots, lemons and onions are just some of the fruits and vegetables that can be placed into Kaiku and turned into the raw material for paints, inks and dyes.

kaiku-nicole-stjernsward-imperial-college-graduate-project-2019-food-waste-vegeatable-skin-pigment_dezeen_2364_col_11.jpg

Skins and peels are boiled in water to produce a dye, which is transferred to a reservoir in the Kaiku system. Along with hot, pressurised air, this dye is forced through an atomising nozzle into a glass vacuum cleaner.

The fine mist produced is hot enough that it vaporises almost instantly, and the dry particles are pulled through the chamber and into the collection reservoir.

kaiku-nicole-stjernsward-imperial-college-graduate-project-2019-food-waste-vegeatable-skin-pigment_dezeen_2364_col_9

Stjernsward designed Kaiku to offer a natural alternative to using artificial pigments that can often be toxic.

“By transitioning to natural based pigments, it will be easier for us to recycle products and make them more circular,” Stjernsward, who studied at Imperial College London, told Dezeen.

“Since many synthetic pigments today are toxic or made of ambiguous materials, colour is typically considered a ‘contamination’ in the Circular Economy principles,” she added. “I hope to change this paradigm.”

kaiku-nicole-stjernsward-imperial-college-graduate-project-2019-food-waste-vegeatable-skin-pigment_dezeen_2364_col_2.jpgThese methods have fallen out of fashion with industrialisation and the introduction of cheaper pigments derived from petrochemicals. But the effect on people and the environment can be disastrous.

kaiku-nicole-stjernsward-imperial-college-graduate-project-2019-food-waste-vegeatable-skin-pigment_dezeen_2364_col_7.jpg

Paints can release petrochemicals into the air long after they have dried, causing respiratory problems and harming the ozone layer. Industrial effluent containing synthetic dyes leaches into the water system, poisoning aquatic life and posing a major health hazard to humans.

kaiku-nicole-stjernsward-imperial-college-graduate-project-2019-food-waste-vegeatable-skin-pigment_dezeen_2364_col_14.jpg

 

More: https://www.dezeen.com/2019/09/02/kaiku-nicole-stjernsward-design-food-waste-pigment/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20Dezeen&utm_content=Daily%20Dezeen+CID_fd110dc5ccf22c0c78ccb76480b07dd0&utm_source=Dezeen%20Mail&utm_term=Kaiku%20turns%20fruit%20and%20vegetable%20waste%20into%20natural%20pigments

 

 

Zaha Hadid retrospective at Venice Biennale features stunning 3D printed chair Jun 1, 2016 | By Tess

iraqi-architect-zaha-hadid-poses-outside-55555241-56fd3fa187683.jpg

The late Zaha Hadid has been recognized as perhaps one of the greatest female architects of our time, if not one of the greatest architects of our time in general. The Iraqi architect’s work broke down barriers within the architectural design as she consistently created fluid, and fragmentary geometric designs. While Hadid, who passed away on March 31st, 2016, was known best for her innovative building designs, the world renowned architect also created a number of stunning pieces of furniture and even dabbled with 3D printing technologies.

More: http://www.3ders.org/articles/20160601-zaha-hadid-retrospective-at-venice-biennale-features-stunning-3d-printed-chair.html

Ferozkoh: Renewing the Arts of the Turquoise Mountain July/August 2015, Written by Lee Lawrence Photographs courtesy of Turquoise Mountain Institute

It is difficult to create art in isolation,” says master calligrapher Khwaja Qamaruddin Cheshti. The artist “needs to be surrounded by older art, and maybe he combines his skills with the inspiration he finds in older pieces.”

Cheshti is speaking through a translator from the Turquoise Mountain Institute for Afghan Arts and Architecture in Kabul, Afghanistan. A restored, 19th-century fort in the historic Murad Khane neighborhood, its alcoves topped with delicately pointed arches, it is a fitting backdrop to speak about two weeks he and more than a dozen Afghan artists and craftspeople spent in Doha, Qatar, at the Museum of Islamic Art—or mia—where Cheshti rediscovered this age-old truth.

More: http://www.aramcoworld.com/en-US/Articles/July-2015/Ferozkoh-Renewing-the-Arts-of-the-Turquoise-Mount

By_Bill_Pottenger-15_lgBy_Bill_Pottenger-23-LEFT_lg2014_02_11_TMI_Jewellery_Ustad_Azim-PRIMARY_LEFT_lgArtPic1_LOW_RES_BUT_BETTER_DESIGN_THAN_LEIGHTONHOUSE_50_lgFerozkoh_C_lgAustad_Nasir_worshop_Woodworkers_working_in_Doha_Project_lghttp://www.aramcoworld.com/en-US/Articles/July-2015/Ferozkoh-Renewing-the-Arts-of-the-Turquoise-Mount

 

The 9th-Century Islamic “Instrument Which Plays by Itself”, From Hyperallergic by Allison Meier on April 12, 2016

allahsautomata06-768x546.jpg

In 2009, Tokyo’s Waseda University built a fedora-sporting flautist robot powered by cranked air. But this is only the most recent attempt at a mechanical, flute-playing musician. In the 9th century, the Banū Mūsā brothers in Baghdad wrote a treatise describing their “instrument which plays by itself.

allashautomatacover-768x941

Cover of ‘Allah’s Automata’ (image courtesy Hatje Cantz) (click to enlarge)

Their innovative machine is described in Allah’s Automata: Artifacts of the Arabic-Islamic Renaissance (800-1200), recently published by Hatje Cantz. The book accompanies an exhibition of the same name, currently on view at the ZKM (Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe) in Germany, that includes a reconstruction of their instrument. While automata had their golden age in Europe from the 16th to 19th centuries — which saw the creation of such devices as the clock of Diana in her chariot that rolled across a table and shot an arrow — in the Islamic world their peak was from the 9th to 13th centuries. The most famous, also reconstructed for Allah’s Automata, is the 12th-century elephant water clock. The shapes of its various hydraulic elements could be interpreted as symbols of the international trade that facilitated its creation by Ismail al-Jazari, including an Indian elephant, Chinese dragons, and an Egyptian phoenix riding above a Muslim scholar who writes the time.

 

Issey Miyake’s technology-driven clothing designs on view in Tokyo from artdaily.com

  • TOKYO.- An exhibition devoted to designer Issey Miyake is on view until June 13, 2016 at the National Art Center, Tokyo. The Center has considered design to be an important exhibition theme since it opened in 2007 and is devoted to presenting a wide range of artistic expressions and proposing new perspectives. This exhibition, Miyake Issey Exhibition: The Work of Miyake Issey, promises to be an unprecedented event, focusing on the entirety of Miyake’s 45-year career, from 1970 to the present.

    Miyake has consistently presented new methodologies and possibilities for making clothes, while always focusing on the future. It all began in 1960 when Miyake, a student at Tama Art University, sent a letter to the World Design Conference, which was being held for the first time in Japan that year. The letter took issue with the fact that clothing design was not included in the event. At that point, Miyake’s notion that clothing is not merely “fashion” ― i.e., something that changes with the times ― but a form of design that is closely connected to our lives on a much more universal level was already apparent. Miyake has always explored the relationship between a piece of cloth and the body, and the space that is created as a result, unrestricted by any existing framework. In addition, along with his team of designers, he persistently undertakes research and development to create clothing that combines both innovation and comfort.

    This exhibition sheds light on Miyake’s ideas about making things and his approach to design by examining his entire career, from his earliest work to his latest projects, and his explorations of greater creative possibilities in the future. This exhibition provides viewers with an opportunity to expand the boundaries of their thought and stimulate their creativity, allowing everyone, young and old alike, to experience the joy of creation.

 

New livery for Dubai Metro carriages featuring artworks by accomplished artists – Courtesy October Gallery London.

dubai_metro2

Dubai, UAE; April 28, 2015: The Dubai Culture & Arts Authority (Dubai Culture), in collaboration with RTA, is redefining the UAE’s artistic landscape by working with local and international artists to wrap the Dubai Metro carriages with works of art.

The spectacular artworks of prominent artists, Abdulqader Al Rais, Rachid Koraichi and Safwan Dahoul have now debuted as Dubai Metro carriage wraps, following the unveiling of the first Dubai Metro carriage wrapped with a spellbinding photograph by HH Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai and Chairman of the Dubai Executive Council.

More: http://www.octobergallery.co.uk/artists/koraichi/dubai_metro.shtml