Wallpaper murals used to be a major splurge, but new tech is bringing them to the masses by By Michelle Brunner from The Washington Post, Home & Garden

Designers love scenic wallpaper for its ability to transform a room. Unlike regular wallpaper, which often has a repeating pattern, scenic wallpaper fills an entire wall with a single, mural-like image. Usually depicting an outdoor tableau, the wallpaper brings nature inside and lends old-world appeal to a space. Just flip through any recent design magazine and you’ll probably see a well-appointed room with walls covered in large-scale images of flowering vines or swaying trees.

Woodchip & Magnolia’s Zephyr wallpaper mural (about $255 for up to about 108 square feet). (Woodchip & Magnolia)

“People embrace things that feel handmade and have a link to the past,” says Susan Harter, who makes hand-painted scenic wallpaper in her Port Townsend, Wash., studio. “At a time when we’re being bombarded with technology, it’s nice to be in a haven of one’s own making. It’s like entering a peaceful mini-Eden.”

Until recently, if you wanted the look, you had to splurge on custom wallcoverings from luxury brands such as Zuber et Cie, Gracie Studio, de Gournay and Fromental. Those handmade paper or silk panels can cost thousands of dollars, and that’s without installation.

For a home in McLean, Va., Shazalynn Cavin-Winfrey covered the dining room walls with a mural from Gracie Studio. (John Bessler)

But scenic wallpaper has become far more accessible. Thanks to digital-printing technology that allows retailers to duplicate the look inexpensively, you no longer have to blow your entire decorating budget on a few pricey panels of chinoiserie.

High-definition printers aren’t exactly new to the luxury wallpaper business; the London-based brand Iksel has been producing high-end digital collections based on hand-painted works since 2004. And Harter’s company, Susan Harter Muralpapers, has been using the technology for several years to turn her hand-painted murals into custom canvas wallcoverings.

More: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/wallpaper-murals-used-to-be-a-major-splurge-but-new-tech-is-bringing-them-to-the-masses/2019/04/08/c3c9eca8-5574-11e9-9136-f8e636f1f6df_story.html

Leader of the Arts and Crafts Movement -William Morris by Vinita Mathur from The Startup

William Morris was born on March 24, 1834, (1834–1896) in Walthamstow, England. He was the third child of William Morris Sr. and Emma Shelton Morris. He enjoyed an idyllic childhood in the countryside, playing with his siblings, reading books, writing, and showing an early interest in nature and storytelling. His love of the natural world would have a growing influence on his later work.

At an early age he was attracted to all the trappings of the medieval period. At 4 he began reading Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, which he finished by the time he was 9. His father gave him a pony and a miniature suit of armor and, dressed as a tiny knight, he went off on long quests into the nearby forest.

Later Morris attended Marlborough and Exeter colleges, where he met painter Edward Burne-Jones and poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti, forming a group known as the Brotherhood, or the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. They shared a love of poetry, the Middle Ages, and Gothic architecture, and they read the works of philosopher John Ruskin. They also developed an interest in the Gothic Revival architectural style. Their Group was inspired by Ruskin’s writings.

The Industrial Revolution that began in Britain had turned the country into something unrecognizable to the young men. Ruskin wrote about society’s ills in books such as “The Seven Lamps of Architecture” and “The Stones of Venice.” The group discussed Ruskin’s themes about the impacts of industrialization: how machines dehumanize, how industrialization ruins the environment, and how mass production creates shoddy, unnatural objects.

The group believed that the artistry and honesty in handcrafted materials were missing in British machine-made goods. They longed for an earlier time.

Visits to the continent spent touring cathedrals and museums solidified Morris’ love of medieval art. Rossetti persuaded him to give up architecture for painting, and they joined a band of friends decorating the walls of the Oxford Union with scenes from the Arthurian legend based on “Le Morte d’Arthur” by 15th century English writer Sir Thomas Malory. Morris also wrote much poetry during this time.

After receiving his degree in 1856, Morris took a job in the Oxford office of G.E. Street, a Gothic Revivalist architect. That year he financed the first 12 monthly issues of The Oxford and Cambridge Magazine, where a number of his poems were printed. Two years later, many of these poems were reprinted in his first published work “The Defence of Guenevere and Other Poems.”

Also known as a writer and poet, translator, social activist, printer and dyer, Morris originally trained as an architect and had early ambitions to become a painter.Morris commissioned Philip Webb, an architect he had met in Street’s office, to build a home for him and his wife. The building’s design was a co-operative effort, with Morris focusing on the interiors and the exterior being designed by Webb, for whom the House represented his first commission as an independent architect. Named after the red bricks and red tiles from which it was constructed, Red House rejected architectural norms by being L-shaped. Influenced by various forms of contemporary Neo-Gothic architecture, the House was nevertheless unique, with Morris describing it as “very mediaeval in spirit”. Situated within an orchard, the house and garden were intricately linked in their design. It took a year to construct.

In fact William Morris often said that when looking into his wallpaper designs they should appear to be 3 inches deep. This illusion of depth was created by his clever use of floral and fauna. He would layer these images to make it seem as if there was space beyond. So by using William Morris wallpaper you may even make a room feel a bit bigger .

The house, a grand yet simple structure, exemplified the Arts and Crafts philosophy inside and out, with craftsman-like workmanship and traditional, unornamented design. Then, together with some of his Pre-Raphaelite friends he furnished and decorated the new abode. It was such an enjoyable experience that they decided to set up their own company in London supplying a range of domestic furnishings — embroidery, tableware, furniture, stained glass and tiles (initially called Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co — later simply Morris & Co). It was also because of his inability to find wallpapers that he liked enough for his own home that Morris turned his hand to designing his own, and these were added to the company catalogue.

More: https://medium.com/swlh/leader-of-the-arts-and-crafts-movement-william-morris

Zaha Hadid retrospective at Venice Biennale features stunning 3D printed chair Jun 1, 2016 | By Tess

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The late Zaha Hadid has been recognized as perhaps one of the greatest female architects of our time, if not one of the greatest architects of our time in general. The Iraqi architect’s work broke down barriers within the architectural design as she consistently created fluid, and fragmentary geometric designs. While Hadid, who passed away on March 31st, 2016, was known best for her innovative building designs, the world renowned architect also created a number of stunning pieces of furniture and even dabbled with 3D printing technologies.

More: http://www.3ders.org/articles/20160601-zaha-hadid-retrospective-at-venice-biennale-features-stunning-3d-printed-chair.html

Chocolatexture: A Series of Chocolates to Represent Japanese Words For Texture Created by Nendoby Johnny Strategy on January 22, 2015

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Japanese design office Nendo has created 9 different types of chocolate. While each are the same size, not a single piece from the Chocolatexture collection look alike. That’s because Oki Sato, who leads the Tokyo and Milan-based firm, rethought the concept of chocolate by focusing on texture. “There are many factors that determine a chocolate’s taste,” says Sato, referring to factors like the origin of cocoa, the percentage used, and the various different flavors. But by instead turning his attention to attributes like pointy, smooth and rough, the designer has created distinctive chocolates that all use identical ingredients but taste completely different due to the various textures.

Each of the 9 chocolates were inspired by an onomatopoeic word from the Japanese language that describes texture. The chocolates correspond with words like “toge toge” (sharp pointy tips), “sube sube” (smooth edges and corners) and “zara zara” (granular, like a file). Chocolatexture was created for the Maison & Objet trade fair currently taking place this week in Paris. 400 limited edition Chocolatexture sets were created and will be sold during the event in Paris at what’s being dubbed the “Chocolatexture lounge.” (syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

Chocolatexture: A Series of Chocolates to Represent Japanese Words For Texture Created by Nendo

Samsung taps Lee Don-tae as its design wizard 15th January 2015 http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/article.aspx?aid=2999683&cloc=joongangdaily|home|newslist1

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Can Samsung Electronics finally nail the design thing?

In 1996, Samsung Electronics Chairman Lee Kun-hee said: “The decisive point in 21st-century business management will be design.”

Ever since, the tech giant has been trying to improve its design.

But as rival Apple won accolade after accolade for its designs – in addition to millions of devoted customers – Samsung had as many misses as hits in the design department.

Now, the Korean tech giant is promising once again to revolutionize its approach to design by hiring Lee Don-tae, the co-president of the global design consulting firm Tangerine.

Earlier this month, Samsung hired the 47-year-old Gangwon native as its global design team leader.

Lee, who is also a professor at the industrial design department of Hongik University, joined Tangerine as an intern in 1998 and became its president in just seven years.

What’s interesting is that London-based Tangerine was founded by Jonathan Ive, who is the senior vice president of design at Apple and who has led the designs of the iPhone, iPad and IOS7. Samsung expects Lee to bring Tangerine’s design “DNA” to the company as Ive did at Apple.

Industry insiders are watching Samsung’s recruitment of Lee because he is not known as a mere designer but a “design entrepreneur.”

Lee, who has a master’s degree from the Royal College of Art in London, is best known for redesigning British Airways’ business-class cabins. By rearranging the seat configuration in an “S” shape, he found more space for each seat and allowed them to fold down into flat beds.

This design won the IDEA Grand Prix in 2001 and British Airways eventually commissioned his company to redesign its first-class cabins as well. The airline reportedly saw its annual operating profits increase by 800 billion won.

“Design isn’t a tool to achieve the designer’s self-realization,” Lee said in his book “Foresight Creator.” “The designer should always consider the risk of the company.”

Samsung hopes his contribution will be spread far beyond designing products. His work at Samsung’s Design Management Center will be under the control of Samsung Electronics President Yoon Boo-keun, who heads the company’s consumer electronics division.

“Lee will be in charge of leading innovation of overall and general design of Samsung products including smartphones,” an official from Samsung said.

Samsung has been recruiting many designers from outside. It previously hired Tim Gudgel, a former senior Apple Retail Store designer, and Chris Bangle, who is known as one of the world’s top three automobile designers.

Industry insiders say that as the market enters a mature stage, the functions and performances of products are becoming the same, while design can bring key differentiation or distinction. While Samsung fought with Apple over design patents on smartphones, the new stage of the war is expected to center on smartwatches.

Lee has been said his keyword in design is “foresight,” which refers to imagining and predicting the future based on data and experiences.

Lee’s collaboration with Samsung already produced results in the past. From 2006 to 2012, he worked as a design master to Samsung C&T and won acclaim for the design of apartment interiors.

The creativity boost is not only happening at Samsung Electronics. Cheil Worldwide, the Samsung affiliate that makes advertisements and does marketing consulting, said Monday that it hired Malcolm Poynton as chief creator officer to boost the company’s presence in the global market.

The New Zealand-born Poynton has more than 30 years of experience in the industry and his resume includes work at agencies like Saatchi & Saatchi, and Ogilvy. He was Europe’s chief creative officer for the digital marketing consulting agency SapientNitro.

He has also chaired and judged various international award shows including Cannes Lions, the Clio Awards, D&AD, the London International Awards, the International Andy Awards and the Webbys.

Meanwhile, Samsung Group is expected to spend 50 trillion won ($46 billion) for facilities and R&D investments this year, which is a similar amount as last year.

Korea’s largest conglomerate doesn’t disclose its investment figures as a group, but a source from Samsung Group said Wednesday that this year’s investment will maintain the previous year’s level.

Samsung reportedly spent around 50 trillion won in 2014. According to industry sources, Samsung’s investment has been growing gradually every year from 42 trillion won in 2011.

Its flagship Samsung Electronics will also likely invest an amount equivalent to what it spent last year. The tech giant reportedly invested 24 trillion won and is expected to spend about 25 trillion won in production facilities, according to sources. About 15 trillion won is expected to be spent on the semiconductor business.

BY KIM YOUNG-HOON, KIM HYUN-YE AND JOO KYUNG-DON [kjoo@joongang.co.kr]