Artistic Expressions of Math Over Seven Centuries by Allison Meier from Hyperallergic

Picturing Math at the Metropolitan Museum of Art has prints dating back to the 15th century, all expressing the beauty of mathematics.

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In 2015, the Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired a series of prints of the most beautiful equations, as drawn by 10 prominent mathematicians and scientists. Mathematician Stephen Smale, for example, chose the relatively simplified numerical analysis equation known as Newton’s Method, first published in the 17th century, while theoretical physicist Steven Weinberg’s demonstration of the Lagrangian of the Electroweak Theory, which contributed to his 1979 Nobel Prize, flows over four dense lines. The 10 prints of mathematical expressions known as the Concinnitas portfolio are the core of Picturing Math: Selections from the Department of Drawings and Prints, currently on view in the Met’s Robert Wood Johnson, Jr. Gallery.

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More: http://hyperallergic.com/361446/picturing-math-at-the-metropolitan-museum-of-art/

Folios from the Jami’ al–Tavarikh (Compendium of Chronicles)

Ghazan Khan (r. 1295–1304) commissioned his vizier Rashid al-Din to write a history of the Mongols. During the reign of Öljeitü (r. 1304–16), this text was expanded into the Jamic al-tavarikh, or Compendium of Chronicles. The text initially comprised three volumes. The first, written for Ghazan, was an account of the Mongol rulers beginning with Genghis Khan. The second volume covered Öljeitü’s life up to the time of writing (1310) as well as the history of the Eurasian peoples. The third, a geography, has not survived. The text was written in Persian and translated into Arabic and perhaps also into Mongolian and Chaghatay Turkish in the atelier at the Rabc-i Rashidi (Rashid’s quarter) in the capital Tabriz. It was stipulated that two copies of the work, in Arabic and Persian, be transcribed every year and distributed in the kingdom.

the rest if the article: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/khan8/hd_khan8.htm